Challenges & Recommendations To Be A Successful Agile Coach

There are various variations of Agile implementation in the real world that are specifically designed to fit within the AS IS hierarchy and operating patterns of current organizations. Top leaders and managers are aware of the critical function an Agile coach plays in enabling an Agile transformation in their company.

Let’s look at a few situations when an Agile coach might be recruited for organizational or project transformation purposes:

  1. When an Agile coach is recruited as an outside contractual consultant for a set period of time to introduce individuals to Agile concepts and values and assist in the transition for one or two releases
  2. When an Agile coach is employed as a full-time employee – once initial awareness is developed by an external consultant but practices are not maintained, the organization wants to implement through a full-time Agile coach.
  3. To create awareness from scratch and take ownership of the duty of implementing Agile on a particular project or account, an Agile coach is either employed as a full-time employee or selected from a pool of Agile professionals available to the organization.

Each of the aforementioned circumstances presents an Agile coach with both advantages (which strengthen the coach) and disadvantages (which present challenges). The suggested strategy must change on the fly depending on these advantages and disadvantages.

Project managers or technical leaders send a few people to find out what they want. While the other team members are likewise interested in Agile, they frequently ponder, “What is this Agile stuff really?” I’d also like to know because I’ll be using Agile for both my coding and my testing. Little is known about this throughout the project or organization as a result. In order for everyone to remain Agile-aware even after the coach leaves at the end of a contract, he or she should distribute Agile learning reference guides and templates on a common repository.

Even if an external coach departs a project or organization, Agile best practices must be maintained with the help of the manager.

Scenario 1:  To raise awareness and guide implementation by providing handholding for one or two releases, an Agile Coach is employed as an external consultant for a particular time period (3 to 6 months).

Pros: 

  • Strong sponsorship from top management (whether in a flat or hierarchical organization);
  • Middle management, for instance. Due to a high management decision, project managers or technical leaders concur and accept the modification.

Cons or Challenges: 

  • Under pressure from upper management, project managers or technical leaders attend all awareness sessions, but they do not fully accept or comprehend the advantages of implementing agile. Due to these GAPS, improper implementation results.
  • Selected members are sent by project managers or technical leaders to learn about their preferences. The remaining team members are also curious about Agile, but they frequently wonder, “What is this Agile stuff really?” As I will also be doing my coding and testing in an Agile manner, I would also like to know. As a result, there is little awareness throughout the project or organization.

Scenario 2:  After the external coach leaves, an Agile Coach is engaged as a full-time employee to oversee implementation.


Pros: 

  • Solid backing from top management (in a hierarchical structure)
  • In a hierarchical organization, middle management, such as project managers or technical leaders, agree and accept the change as a result of top management’s decision.

Cons or Challenges: 

  • Low to moderate top-level management support (in flat or less hierarchical organizations)
  • Middle management, for instance. Project managers and technical leaders have the right to make decisions at the project level, but they are not required to do so (especially in flat or less hierarchical environments).

Scenario 3:  Hired as a full-time employee, the Agile Coach will raise awareness and oversee implementation.


 Pros: 

  • Strong backing from top management OR the SPONSOR (in a hierarchical organization)
  • In a hierarchical organization, middle management, such as project managers or technical leaders, agree and accept the change as a result of top management’s decision.

Cons or Challenges:

  • Under pressure from upper management, project managers or technical leaders attend all awareness sessions, but they do not genuinely accept or comprehend the advantages of implementing Agile. This causes GAPS, which, in the case of a hierarchical organization, leads to erroneous IMPLEMENTATION.
  • Low to moderate top-level management support (in flat or less hierarchical organizations)
  • Middle management, for instance. As they have the authority to make choices at the project level, project managers or technical leaders may not concur, contest every decision, and provide obstacles at every step (in a flat or less hierarchical environment).

how useful was this post?

click on star to rate it.

Author :

sharvari m

View posts by sharvari m


hire Coach

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

error

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)